Year of Memory Work

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Here you will find the collection of videos and printables for the Year of Memory Work with Humility and Doxology.  Bookmark this page, and make sure you are following Humility and Doxology on Facebook and/or YouTube so you don’t miss a week!  And don’t forget to sign up for my email list for subscriber exclusives!

Year of Memory Work; Morning Time Resources

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What is the Year of Memory Work?

That’s right: 52 weeks of beautiful poetry, famous speeches, historic documents, and more are coming your way.

Poetry, speeches, lengthier passages of Scripture, and original historic documents are a key part of our family’s morning time routine.  Considering the limits of our time and energy, I have chosen to focus on those elements rather than lists of facts.

Many families also desire to incorporate these elements of truth, goodness, and beauty in their daily routines, but are unsure where to begin.

Some may be stymied by indecision, feeling a burden to choose the “perfect” or the “best” poem or Bible verse.  (Spoiler alert: there is no perfect memory list, and you won’t find a collection of memory work that will ensure your children become godly, brilliant, and kind.)

Other times, it is feelings of inadequacy that keep someone from incorporating memory work.  Perhaps you don’t feel equipped to choose memory work, and you don’t even know where to go or how to start.

A Year of Memory Work to Inspire and Equip

Whether you relate to either of those challenges, neither, or something else entirely, my desire is to inspire you with this Year of Memory Work!  I’ve curated a list for you from some of my favorite things.  Each week, all you have to do is print out the pdf and recite along with me!

Whether you incorporate memory work in your morning time/circle time routine, poetry teatime, or read-aloud time before bed, I hope the Year of Memory Work enables you to more easily incorporate these beautiful elements into your family’s year.

I also hope you leave feeling equipped to choose and enjoy your own memory work in the years ahead.

Is there a selection you don’t care for in the Year of Memory Work?  Skip it, of course!  You can review a previous week’s selection, or be brave and choose your own poem.

Is there a bit of memory work that entrances your children and captures your imagination?  Feel free to take a few extra weeks on that video.

These videos and this list are to be your tools, not your master.  Use them as best fits in your schedule.  May they be a blessing to you!

I would love to see pictures or videos of you or your children reciting some of the things we learn this year.  You can tag me on social media (I’m @HumilityandDoxology on Instagram, and you can also find me on Facebook and Youtube) so I can like and comment!

November’s Memory Work

Week Forty-Seven: Gettysburg Address, Abraham Lincoln

Video Here

Week Forty-Six: In Flanders Fields, John McCrae

Learn more about integrating memory work with what you’re learning here. What is textbook-free history? Enjoy these free history planning pages!

Week Forty-Five: Psalm 100

Grab the complete Thanksgiving Morning Time Plans and Resource Pack here.

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October’s Memory Work

Week Forty-Four: The Raven, Edgar Allan Poe

Week Forty-Three: St. Crispin’s Day (Henry V), William Shakespeare

Video here

Comparative Shakespeare playlist here

Week Forty-Two: Charge of the Light Brigade, Alfred, Lord Tennyson

Video here

Week Forty-One: Arithmetic, Carl Sandburg

September’s Memory Work

Week Forty: Wynken, Blynken, and Nod, Eugene Field

Video Here

Week Thirty-Nine: Autumn, Emily Dickinson

Week Thirty-Eight: A Walking Song, J.R.R. Tolkien

Video Here

Week Thirty-Seven: Psalm 51

Week Thirty-Six: The Jumblies, Edward Lear

Video Here

August’s Memory Work

Week Thirty-Five: Kubla Khan, Samuel Coleridge

Video Here

Week Thirty-Four: The Tyger, William Blake

Video Here

Discussion questions and activity ideas for “The Tyger”

Week Thirty-Three: Mneumonic for memorizing English monarchs

Video Here

Week Thirty-Two: Sneezles, A. A. Milne

July’s Memory Work

Week Thirty-One: Queen Elizabeth’s Speech to the Troops at Tilbury

Video Here

Week Thirty: Sonnets from the Portuguese XXIX, Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Video Here

Week Twenty-Nine: I’m Nobody! Who are You? Emily Dickinson

Video Here

Week Twenty-Eight: Quality of Mercy, Merchant of Venice, Shakespeare

Shakespeare Resource Round-Up

Video Here

free poetry printable

June’s Memory Work

Week Twenty-Seven: The Declaration of Independence

Video Here

Week Twenty-Six: Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death, Patrick Henry

Video here

Week Twenty-Five: The Wild Rose, Wendell Berry

Video here

Week Twenty-Four: If, Rudyard Kipling

Week Twenty-Three: June 4, 1940, Winston Churchill

Video Here

May’s Memory Work

Week Twenty-Two: The Lake Isle of Innisfree, W. B. Yeats

Video Here 

Week Twenty-One: King Alfred’s War Song

Video Here

Week Twenty: Introduction to Evangeline, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Video Here

Week Nineteen: The Reading Mother, Strickland Gillilan

Video Here

April’s Memory Work

Week Eighteen: The Destruction of Sennacherib, Lord Byron

Video Here

Week Seventeen: Amoretti LXVIII (Most Glorious Lord of Life), Edmund Spenser

Video Here

Week Sixteen: Psalm 139:1-13

Video Here

Week Fifteen: Paul Revere’s Ride, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Video here

Compare the events in the poem with the historic account given here. You can also read a letter Revere wrote to his friend in circa 1798And Then What Happened, Paul Revere, by Jean Fritz, is a fun picture book for all ages! Have you read Johnny Tremaine? It’s a classic work of historical fiction, and Paul Revere is an important character. This anniversary edition has an introduction by Nathan Hale, the graphic historic novelist.

March

Week 14: Jabberwocky, Lewis Carroll

Video here

Week Thirteen: Casey at the Bat, Ernest Thayer

Recommended Supplemental Resources: These are great illustrated versions to add to your library- Casey at the Bat illustrated by Patricia Polacco and Casey at the Bat illustrated by Christopher Bing (a Caldecott Honor book).  Be sure to check out this super fun (and free) baseball art tutorial.

Video Here

Week Twelve: Nothing Gold Can Stay, Robert Frost

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Week Eleven: Pied Beauty, Gerard Manley Hopkins

Don’t miss all the discussion questions shared in the video description!  This poem lends itself as well to some art projects.  Illustrate your printable on your own, or check out all the amazing nature art tutorials available at ChalkPastel.com!

Video Here

Week Ten: Prologue to the Canterbury Tales, Chaucer 

Video Here

February

Week Nine: Death Be Not Proud, John Donne

Video Here

Week Eight: My Shadow, Robert Louis Stevenson

Recommended Supplemental Resources: A Child’s Garden of Verses by Robert Louis Stevenson is a great poetry anthology to enjoy with children of all ages.  Some of our favorites are “My Shadow,” “Bed in Summer,” and “The Swing.”  Try to find an edition with gorgeous illustrations.  Two of my favorite illustrators for A Child’s Garden of Verses are Gyo Fujikawa and Tasha Tudor.

Week Seven: Sonnet 116, William Shakespeare

Recommended Supplemental Resources: How to Teach Your Children Shakespeare, by Ken Ludwig; Tales from Shakespeare, by Charles and Mary Lamb; Beautiful Stories from Shakespeare for children, by E. Nesbit; Shakespeare Stories, by Leon Garfield; “Shakespeare Live! from the RSC” (for parents and older students); Shakespeare’s Sonnets

My Ultimate Shakespeare Resource Round-Up

Video Here

Week Six:  Caedmon’s Hymn

Recommended Supplemental Resources:  Textbook-Free History (also available in podcast form), Medieval History Resources (including other options for memory work), British Museum’s website with images of Bede’s manuscript, listen to this poem in Old English, the Modern Scholar series The Anglo-Saxon World (Aff) and The History of the English Language by Michael Drout

Video Here

Week Five: Mother to Son, Langston Hughes

Recommended supplemental resources: 75+ Books celebrating the lives and achievements of African Americans Coming Home: from the life of Langston Hughes, Floyd Cooper, Poetry for Young People: Langston Hughes 

Video here

Poems to memorize in your morning time

January

Week Four: The Iliad, lines 1-6; Homer (trans. Fitzgerald)

Video Here

Recommended supplemental resources for your study: The Children’s Homer, the opening lines of the Iliad in Greek, Fitzgerald’s complete translation of the Iliad.

Week Three: Ozymandias, Percy Bysshe Shelley

Video Here

Week Two: 1 Corinthians 13

Video Here

Week One: New Year’s Morning, Helen Hunt Jackson

Video Here

 
Join the conversation on Facebook or Instagram and tell me about some of your favorite memory work.   And don’t forget to sign up for my email list for subscriber exclusives!


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