Amy Sloan

Amy Sloan and her husband, John, are second-generation homeschoolers by grace alone to 5 children ages 4, 7, 9, 12, and 14. Their educational philosophy is one of humility and doxology, and follows primarily a classical approach. Amy loves coffee, and starts getting nervous if the stack of to-be-read library books beside her bed is less than 2 feet tall. Get her started on Shakespeare, Jane Austen, Homer, or Hamilton the Musical and it might be hard to get her to stop. Mostly, though, she gets really excited about the Gospel. The Sloan family adventures in North Carolina.

Day in the Life with a 12, 10, 7, 5, and 2 year old

Day in the Life 2018 (with a 12, 10, 7, 5, and 2 year old)

Simple Homeschool Day in the Life series. Each week, we try to faithfully persevere by God’s grace through our routines with consistency, although strict scheduling does not work well for our daily life. Our life is full and wonderful.  It is an odd mix of the mundane and the crazy.  While every “day in the life” looks rather different, each day we seek to approach in humility and repentance, looking to Jesus with hearts full of praise.

Morning Time Gathering Homeschool

Our Morning Gathering: Memory, Laughter, and Relationship      

Morningtime provides the framework for my ultimate goal in education: raising people who believe what is true, honor what is noble, stand uncompromisingly for what is just, keep their desires pure, love things that are lovely and relish those things that are praiseworthy (Philippians 4:8). Our morning gathering lends great joy to this crazy family life. It builds memory, laughter, and relationship into our days.

Humble family worship

Humble Family Devotions

Family devotions or family worship is something that many Christian families desire to incorporate in their daily life.  This desire can often be hindered by confusion over what family devotions are, fear or feelings of inadequacy in conducting them, and the difficulties of consistency.  Even consistent family devotions can be hindered by our own pride, as if somehow going through religious motions makes us more acceptable to God.